Subtask A: Market and Policies

T50 A.1 Global Economic Models
T50 A.1 Global Economic Models
Task 50 Subtask A Report A1
May 2016 - PDF 2.89MB
By: Marc Fontoynont, Jan de Boer, Johan Röklander, Karen Guldhammer, Nanna Sofie Gudmandsen, Yasuko Koga
This reports presents financial data related to lighting installations, before and after retrofit operations. Data are calculated over a large number of years to combine installation costs, maintenance, and energy use. The general principle was to compare the running costs of the “do nothing” approach (keeping the installation as it is and let it die gradually), and the costs associated with a retrofit with highly efficient equipment. For these reasons, long term costs of installation are quite sensitive to the initial cost, and the combined cost of electricity and energy efficiency. Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of lighting installations has been calculated for various types of buildings: offices, schools, homes and industrial buildings. The data supplied attempt to answer to the following questions: - Which installations are low hanging fruits (with shortest payback time)? - For which type of building are retrofit operation more profitable? - How do various parameters influence the payback time (investment costs, efficacy of luminaires and sources, cost of electricity, etc.)? Then various financial models to initiate successful investments in retrofit operations with generally favourable potentials (like high number of operating hour with good reduction potentials of electric power density) were investigated: - Direct investment by the user only, showing significant benefits after the payback time. - Investment by the user based on loans. This extends payback time, but does not require too high of a financial contribution at the beginning. - Leasing of the entire installation: the building owner does not own the installation. The lighting installation is rented (installation and operation is supplied by a third party). It appears that leasing is nowadays generally the best option is the best way to trigger lighting retrofit to overcome the barriers associated to investment.
T50 A.2 Barriers and Benefits; Building energy regulation and certification
T50 A.2 Barriers and Benefits; Building energy regulation and certification
Task 50 Subtask A Report A2
May 2016 - PDF 1.78MB
By: Marc Fontoynont, Jan de Boer, Johan Röklander, Karen Guldhammer, Nanna Sofie Gudmandsen, Yasuko Koga
This report addresses in a first part barriers and benefits in lighting retrofits and in second part building energy regulations and certifications. Barriers and benefits Benefit of lighting retrofits should be addressed in a broad manner: energy saving, increased value (and rental value), improved functionality, human and social benefits. A possible way, which was pursued in this study, was to compare benefits of lighting retrofits with benefits of other types of retrofits or actions (change of furniture, change of floor, etc.). Also various barriers which lead to postponement of lighting retrofits were identified, even when they are needed and cost effective. Building Energy Regulation and Certification Buildings are designed, constructed and operated in the context of standards, regulations or labels (e.g. sustainability labels). For typical and representative approaches on component and system basis critical analysis and comparisons were conducted. With respect to now highly efficient SSL lighting, measures like requesting a minimum luminaire efficiency, taking old installations (luminaires) out of operation and demanding a maximum energy demand on the basis of reference technologies are presented. In addition the sustainability labels LEED, BREEAM and DGNB were compared and recommendations for future developments
T50 A.3 Proposal of actions concerning the value chain
T50 A.3 Proposal of actions concerning the value chain
Task 50 Subtask A Report A3
May 2016 - PDF 0.89MB
By: Marc Fontoynont, Jan de Boer, Johan Röklander, Karen Guldhammer, Nanna Sofie Gudmandsen, Yasuko Koga
In this activity, possible actions which could be taken to stimulate the development of lighting retrofit campaigns were identifies, based on the figures from report A.1 “Global economic models” and A.2 “Barriers and Benefits; Building energy regulation and certification”. It was looked into how lighting retrofit benefits are assessed by stakeholders (manufacturers, installers, building managers, etc.). Key strategic actions, or key strategic data to deliver to each stakeholder to possibly trigger a decision concerning lighting retrofit were investigated. The objectives are to identify possible lack of awareness and know-how in the value chain, and to identify strategic information to deliver to stakeholders. Globally, the actions concern accelerating retrofits before the end of existing life of lighting installations: this means that benefits justify an anticipated (before end of gear lifetime) investment.