Subtask B: Methodologies, Tools and Case studies for Urban Energy concepts

Urban energy concept Solar district heating Methodology and tools
Urban energy concept Solar district heating Methodology and tools
Technical Report of IEA SHC Task 52, subtask B - Methodologies, Tools and Case studies for Urban Energy concepts
June 2018 - PDF 1.04MB
By: Martin Joly (Sorane, CH), Paul Bourdoukan (Sorane, CH), Jan-Bleicke Eggers (ISE, DE), Martin Andersen (SERC, SE), Chris Bales (SERC, SE), Gabriel Ruiz (CREM, CH), Daniel Trier (Planenergi, DK), Christine Weber (BKW, CH), Sebastian Herkel (ISE, DE)
Editor: Martin Joly

This report summaries the different achievements of the subtask B focused on Methodologies, Tools and Case studies for Urban Energy concepts. In the first chapter, we will present the preliminary studies made on existing tools and on the assessment of the needs of urban actors. These studies were used as a base to build a new methodology. In the second chapter, we present a methodology to guide stakeholders in their different choices when projecting a solar district heating in urban environment. The case studies analysis is presented in a the Case Study report of Task 52

Solar District Heating Trends and Possibilities
Solar District Heating Trends and Possibilities
Characteristics of Ground-Mounted Systems for Screening of Land Use Requirements and Feasibility
March 2018 - PDF 5.98MB
By: Daniel Trier, Federico Bava, Christian Kok, Skov Simon, Stendorf Sørensen

To reach a high solar fraction for a given town, a large number of roof mounted solar collector systems will in general be required, as the size of each system is limited by the roof area available. Given a certain area required to reach a specific solar fraction, a large ground-mounted system will often have a much lower total cost due to economy of scale. Hence, it is relevant to determine whether it would be more feasible to place large solar collector fields outside a town and supply heat to the district heating (DH) network through a transmission pipe, rather than to install many smaller solar heating systems on rooftops within the town. The analysis shows that the economies of scale of groundmounted solar collector systems can normally compensate for the extra costs of transmission pipes, as long as these are not too long, so that the resulting total cost of solar heat can become acceptable. This report aims at answering a few key questions regarding the development of largescale solar thermal systems supplying DH networks, which will be referred to as “solar district heating” (SDH): We have seen a strong SDH development in Denmark in the past decade – what are the characteristics of the Danish SDH systems? and Would it be possible to see a similar development in other countries?