Country Report - Ghana

Status of Solar Heating/Cooling and Solar Buildings - 2016

Status of the Market for Solar Thermal Systems

Market Size and Trends

As at the end of July, 2015, the total installed capacity of solar water heating systems is estimated to be 1018.48kWth (1454.97 m2). During the market survey, the capacity captured was 725.9 kWth.

Typical Applications and Products

Table 14 shows the various categories that make up the capacity captured. The difference between the estimated and captured capacities (292.58 kWth) was based on the information from the installers that were not captured during the survey.

Main Market Drivers

To reduce the costs of the energy and to get a reliable power source in the country.

Industry

No data available.

Employment

No data available.

Costs

The cost of solar water heating systems and components in Ghana varies depending on the country of origin and the company that manufactured it. The price also depends on the type of system that has been installed i.e. direct or indirect and thermo siphon or pumped systems. Some cost information and analysis has been given below.

A Typical Single Family house

Assuming a medium hot water demand of 50l per day, a single-family size of 4 people will demand 200l of hot water daily. The average price for a 200l cost for such system is shown in Table 18.

The cost of a typical large scale commercial installation of a pumped system of a flat plate collector area of 132 m2 and storage tank volume of 9000 litre is estimated at €66,370.00

Other Key Topics

None.

Status of the Market for Solar Buildings

Scope

No data available.

Market Size and Trends

No data available.

Main Market Drivers

No data available.

Employment

No data available.

Costs

No data available.

Other Key Topics

No data available.

R&D Activities

R&D Programmes

No data available.

R&D Infrastructure

R&D Institutions
Institution Type of Institution Relevant Research Areas IEA SHC Involvement Website
Center for Renewable and Energy (CREK) ECREEE www.crek.kpoly.edu.gh
Institute of Tropical Agriculture (KITA) ECREEE www.kitaghana.org
The Energy Center, College of Engineering, KNUST - Kumasi ECREEE www.energycenter.knust.edu.gh
Kumasi Insitute of Technology, Energy and Environment (KITE) ECREEE www.kiteonline.net
University of Cape Coast ECREE ucc.edu.gh
University of Ghana ECREEE www.ug.edu.gh/agric-eng
University of Development Studies ECREEE www.eds.edu.gh
College of Agriculture Education, University of Education ECREEE www.uew.edu.gh/campuses/college-agriculture-education
Energy Systems Engineering Department ECREEE www.koforiduapoly.com.edu.gh
Crop Research Insitute (CRI) - Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR ECREEE www.cropsresearch.org
University of Energy and Natural Resources, Sunyani ECREEE uenr.edu.gh/soe/department-of-energy-and-environmental-engin

Actual Innovations

No data available.

Support Framework

Background

To support and promote Renewable Energy (RE) security in the country, the Government of Ghana (GoG) through an Act of Parliament enacted the RE Act, 2011 (Act 832). The object of the Act is to provide for the development, management, utilisation, sustainability and adequate supply of renewable energy for the generation of heat and power and for other related matters in an efficient and environmentally friendly manner. The Ministry of Energy is mandated to provide policy direction for the achievement of the objectives of the Act. To execute the work packages necessary in fulfilment of the objectives of the Act, the roles of some key related agencies are discussed.

Government Agencies Responsible for Solar Thermal, for Solar Building Activities

  • Energy Commission: Technical regulation and licensing for RE electricity generation, transmission and distribution;
  • Public Utilities and Regulation Commission (PURC): Economic regulation and setting tariffs for electricity including the RE Feed-in-Tariff.
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Environmental regulation and permitting.
  • Ghana Investment Promotion Centre (GIPC): Assist and facilitate incentives for private sector investments.
  • Besides the RE Act 2011, the following Acts have also been enacted to promote the sustainable development of RE:
  • Energy Commission Act 1997, (Act 541) to promote the development and efficient use of RE
  • Public procurement Act 2003, (Act 663) an economic instrument to promote direct investment in the RE
  • Ghana Investment Promotion Council Act 2013 (Act 865); provides tax incentives for investments located outside industrialized centres.
  • Value Added Tax 2013, (Act 870); this provides exemption for RE energy equipment imported in parts into the country.

Most Important Public Support Measure(s) for Solar Thermal and for Solar Buildings

  • Feed-in-tariff scheme under which electricity generated from RE sources would be offered a guaranteed price.
  • Purchase obligation under which power distribution utilities and bulk electricity consumers will be obliged to purchase a certain percentage of their energy required from electricity generated from RE sources.
  • Net Metering (distributed generation) under which RE generated on site may be delivered to the local utility to offset the cost of electricity provided by the utility.
  • Off-grid Electrification aims at promoting mini-grid and stand-alone RE systems for remote off-grid systems.

Information Resources

National Solar Associations (industry and non-industry)

No data available.

National Associations on Green/Solar/Sustainable Buildings

No data available.

Most Important Media for Solar Thermal and Solar Buildings

No data available.